Static Extension Position: The Anti-Sit Move

Sitting isn't going anywhere anytime soon.  I know we have standing workstations now, and funny fitness ball chairs, but in the big picture, we have made great technological advances that benefit us, yet require us to sit for long periods.

If you're fearful of what your extended chair time might be doing to your body, I want you to first take a deep breath and let it go.  Your body will adapt to the environment it is in, and the stimulus you give it.  Did that sink in?  That means you can interrupt the pattern, and sitting isn't a bad thing.  I'd like you to meet. . . 

Static Extension

Start in the hands and knees position.  Place your hands under shoulders and knees under hips.  (You may need a mirror or a friend because what you THINK is aligned may not be).  

Walk your hands a HAND LENGTH away from you.  Now don't go too far.  If your hips began directly over your knees, your end result should look like the photo. (see 'troubleshooting' below)

Re-position your shoulders over your wrists again.  Keeping your elbows straight, drop your shoulder blades together, put an arch in your low back, and drop your head.


This is a personal favorite because of what it does:

Reduces Thoracic and Pelvic Rotation

Addresses Pelvic Disparities and Elevation

Teaches the Shoulders how to Load

Encourages Hip Flexor Engagement

Encourages the 'S' Curve in your Spine

Re-Educates Muscles of shoulder arm hip pelvis back

Repositions Head

Addresses Neck Pain

Static Extension Position What

Now that I covered the what, you can deduce the why.  So now, who should use this move?

Spin Enthusiasts

Posteriorly Tilted Pelvis (tucked under)

'C' curved spine

Forward Head

Upper Cross Syndrome

Weak Hip Flexors

Rounded Shoulders

Elevated Hip

Bicycle Riders 

Neck Pain

Twisted Torso or Pelvis

After sitting for 30+minutes 


TROUBLESHOOTING:

See how this model is demonstrating hips swaying or bailing to the floor.  

See how this model is demonstrating hips swaying or bailing to the floor.  

Does your lower back hurt when you do this?  Does this feel like a really hard move for your back to hold?  Most likely you've walked TOO far with your hands, and your hips are bailing towards the floor.  Check your starting position.  Your hips should be DIRECTLY over your knees.  Walk the hands 6" away.  I put my palm where my fingertips are.

kisspng-arm-fist-push-up-physical-exercise-lunge-arm-5a8f7347a23539.2434923115193505996644.jpg

Do your wrists hurt?  Pain in your hands?  This is a sign that your shoulders are not doing their job bearing the load.  They've been shifting the work effort to the lower arm and it is compensating.  You might have noticed your elbows keep bending.  Until your shoulder can strengthen in this position, you can make a fist as a modification. 

Do Your Elbows Hurt?  You guessed it, you're in compensation.  You can regress to fists, or you can also do this move on your elbows. *Don't Let Your Hands Touch!  Keep them in line with your shoulders.  In the very least, the forearms MUST stay parallel while you're on elbows.  

While on elbows this model is taking the golfer grip hand position and rotating the upper arm outward.  He is making sure his hands do NOT touch.

While on elbows this model is taking the golfer grip hand position and rotating the upper arm outward.  He is making sure his hands do NOT touch.

Pain is not something to be feared, it is something to be understood. For most of us we already understand that we don't move enough, or with necessary quality.  This is one way to add that stimulus to your daily routine.  You brush your teeth, wipe your ass, get dressed (sometimes). . . To live well, we must also MOVE WELL.

I want to move well